Nutrition Timing and Exercise

Visit us at www.eastwesthealing.com Facebook http Nutritional coaching eastwesthealing.com The Metabolic Blueprint Program eastwesthealing.com Simply put, nutrient timing means being mindful of when to eat, rather than just what to eat. Its premise is to support optimal performance during a training session, provide all that is needed for muscle growth, exploit glycogen replenishment after activity, and follow a diet that promotes growth and repair around the clock. Nutrient timing is based on data supporting variances in hormonal release throughout the day and in response to exercise (see “Endocrinology 101″ on page 43). Ivy and Portman have divided the day into three phases to illustrate nutrient timing. The nutrient timing cycle begins with the workout: the energy phase. This phase is marked by the athlete’s need for sufficient energy to allow muscle contraction. Ivy and Portman emphasize the importance of nutrient delivery and of sparing carbohydrate and protein, limiting immune suppression, minimizing muscle damage and setting the stage for faster postworkout recovery. Glucose, derived from glycogen (its stored form in liver and muscle) or blood glucose, is an essential fuel source for activity. Reliance on glucose increases directly with training intensity (Wildman & Miller 2004). Glucose depletion is indicated by a decrease in time to fatigue during activity—much to an athlete’s dismay (Robergs & Roberts 1997). The need for carbohydrate ingestion during activity

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13 Responses to “Nutrition Timing and Exercise”

  1. Thanks my friend. I appreciate you willing to open up a bit and listen to what I have to say. I know i talk fast and get deep, but it is me. I do appreciate the love, as well as much as I appreciate the “hate” that I get at times.

  2. Hi Josh,
    I’m a Nursing student and I just wanted to say that I love your honesty and the way you are weaving all of this information together. It’s brilliant and I very appreciate it man.

  3. What are you thoughts on low fat raw vegan?

  4. What is a good general recommendation for protein/fat/carbs for someone who strength trains 2-3 days a week and a good amount of walking the other days?

  5. Check out Strengthcamp :)

  6. Hey Josh,

    Have you or will you do a video on Intermittent Fasting? I seem to see problems with it with too much growth hormone, drinking too much water on an empty stomach/working out with no nutrition and what will happen if you do it for too long. Also what may be better, doing heavy sprints vs walking when in a caloric deficit and when in a surplus.

    Thanks

  7. Personally I love the technical terminology Josh uses. I don’t understand it all, but I’d rather aim high and hit a decent level of understanding, than limit my knowledge from the start. For me this is the value of youtube and modern media, you get to sit back and absorb the best information in the world that would ordinarily take a lifetime of research to pull together, all at the click of a button.

  8. Hey Josh,
    If one’s goal were to gain weight in the form of lean muscle mass, for a football player or a bodybuilder. For someone who’s already got a fast metabolism, could it be benificial to bumb up the calories using more calorie dense foods wich in expense may not be as healthy? or would you stick to the same approach as if the only goal was to get healthy?

  9. Thank you once again:)

  10. YOu can visit our FB pages, watch more of our youtubes, etc to learn more. It is hard to make explain it in lamens terms. As well, we have our metabolic blueprint program you can check out…all the links are in the description. Pretty simple..carbs + protein down reg cortisol, reduce inflammation and thus regulate blood sugar

  11. Don’t worry…getting confused is a good thing and challenges you to learn….I used to get confused to and still do but you will put the pieces together if you keep watching and understand the body much better…and when you do it will be that much more fun…! Best of luck :)

  12. I would love to find a channel like this that takes it down a couple notches on the technical nomenclature. I am interested, but not entirely grasping the concepts. Do you have a version for “dummies”?

  13. Always coming with nonstop informative videos from day 1…can’t get enough of this dude! Thanks Josh.