Sometimes the Enzyme Myth Is True

Subscribe for free to Dr. Greger’s videos at bit.ly Donate at bit.ly DESCRIPTION: There are a few examples of plant enzymes having physiologically relevant impacts on the human diet, and the formation of sulforaphane in broccoli is one of them. Have a question about this video? Leave it in the comment section at nutritionfacts.org and I’ll try to answer it! If you’re new to sulforaphane, check out my recent videos Broccoli Versus Breast Cancer Stem Cells (nutritionfacts.org and Sulforaphane: From Broccoli to Breast (nutritionfacts.org For more videos on raw food diets check out Raw Food Diet Myths (nutritionfacts.org Best Cooking Method (nutritionfacts.org and Raw Food Nutrient Absorption (nutritionfacts.org And for more on keeping our good bacteria happy, see these 9 videos on gut flora (nutritionfacts.org including one on how the phytonutrients in flax seeds go through a similar transformation in our gut, Just the Flax, Ma’am (nutritionfacts.org Then of course there are hundreds of other videos on 1200 or so topics (nutritionfacts.org Note that one of the sources for this video is open access, so you can download it by clicking on the link above in the Sources Cited section. Also, please check out my associated blog post: nutritionfacts.org
Video Rating: 5 / 5

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4 Responses to “Sometimes the Enzyme Myth Is True”

  1. Thank you for the long and kind reply. I do mostly eat vegstables raw, but sometimes it’s nice with a cooked soup.

  2. Yep you are correct. Bromelain too does quite a bit for the the body too, not just digestion. There are probably a bunch of really great plant enzymes that are destroyed by cooking…but thats not the main reason to eat lots of raw plants. The vitamin, antioxidants, and mineral complexes are greatly reduced in cooking which is why we should eat lots of raw plants. I have no reason why the enzyme idea is touted so much in the raw food community.

  3. It’d be wonderful if you could post it to this specific video on nutritionfacts. org. This way more people benefit from the response, and I can actually provide you with links (which I can’t do on Youtube). Thanks!

  4. How about papaya, I heard they contain some digestive enzymes too, is that true?